Weekender Bahrain, Saturday, December 14 2019

‘The Demolition Man’ exerting his dominion in Bahrain!

admin 25-Jul-2019

‘The Demolition Man’ exerting his dominion in Bahrain!

 

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MMA and the BRAVE Combats are all the rage in Bahrain right now, thanks to the wonderful leadership and admirable enthusiasm of Shaikh Khalid bin Hamad Al Khalifa and the Sports Minister Shaikh Nasser bin Hamad Al Khalifa. MMA is a household name, and Bahrain’s champions are now rightful celebrities. This past week UFC GYM Bahrain hosted Alistair ‘The Demolition Man’ Overeem. He is a Strikeforce Heavyweight Champion, interim DREAM Heavyweight Champion, K-1 World Grand Prix Champion, and one of the only two fighters in the world to hold titles in both MMA and K-1 kickboxing at the same time.

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‘The Demolition Man’ has been training since the age of 15, and 24 years later, he is literally a force to reckon with. Considered one of the best-rounded heavyweights in the sport, he is best known for his excellence and power on the striking field.

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Checkout Weekender’s conversation with ‘The Demolition Man’ as he took a break from bringing his opponents to their knees:

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W. What inspired you to train for the MMA?

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Overeem: That is a good question. It’s a certain kind of motivation that makes people do what they do, its why I do what I do. Its because I love it. It is my passion, I guess. I just really enjoy doing it, and the feeling after you have trained and won a fight, and also the feeling after you have lost a fight, though not a good feeling, it pushes you to do more, to make changes, to develop, to grow. I guess that’s my inspiration.

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W. What, from the horse’s mouth, is the story behind the ‘Demolition Man’ title?

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Overeem: There was a movie by that name, a long while ago. When I was training, the movie was a part of everyday pop culture, not anymore. The movie stuck with me, my peers promoted ‘The Demolition Man’ as my nickname, and it never changed.

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W. Who do you idolize?

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Overeem: There are a few people I idolize, but they are not famous. I don’t tend to look up to famous people. I admire athletes, their abilities, and their level of professionalism, but I don’t idolize anybody.

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W. What, in your recollection, was the toughest part of your journey to being an MMA champion?

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Overeem: The year 2006 threw personal hardships at me, which took a toll on my sports career as well. My mother was diagnosed with cancer. She survived, thankfully. My baby Storm was also born in the same year. Being a new parent, waking up at odd times, not being able to maintain a routine, made my sports career suffer. Though, these are the only circumstances under which I’ve had to stand down. But you get through it, you survive, you get better.

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W. What is the one advice you would give to budding MMA enthusiasts?

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Overeem: Train a lot, train hard, but also train clever. I think development is learning new things, always. I don’t think there are many athletes who have very long careers, its usually just 10 or 15 years. The big trick is always learning and developing. Accessing information or guidance these days is easy. You can easily go to the required location, you can change locations, you can read, and there is growth there. Put in the hours, make the hours, do it a lot. If you are going to do one hour a day for 3 days a week, that’s 3 hours a week. Or you could do 4 hours a day for 7 days a week, and that’s 28 hours a week. It makes all the difference.